Professor Laneshia Conner

When Laneshia Conner was in graduate school, an instructor told her that she had great questions. From there, she says she began to find that she had more questions than answers. In this “Research Made Possible” podcast produced by Research Communications, Conner discusses her work that is centered on improving scientific knowledge about HIV prevention for older Black women.  

BIRCWH  Logo: Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health at The University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH) program is accepting applications for scholars interested in research to advance women’s health.

rachel saunders headshot

The Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics (APGO) recognized Rachel Saunders, MD, as a 2023 APGO Humanism in Teaching Award recipient. Saunders is an associate professor in The UK College of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Dr. Carl Watson

Carl Watson, MD, made history as the first Black graduate of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. He earned his doctorate in 1964 as a member of the college’s first graduating class, and his impact in medicine continued through a decades-long career as an obstetrician and gynecologist. 

Joseph Stuart in front of the Markey Cancer Center for Women's Care

Upstairs in the University of Kentucky Johnson Center’s Blue Studio on a Wednesday night, a crowd begins to gather — first a trickle, then smaller groups. Soon, a line develops outside the door as participants check in.

A child standing in front of the words, "See it. Stop it."

A team of researchers at the University of Kentucky continues to advance strategies to prevent child sex trafficking (CST) across the Commonwealth through a training program for middle school staff.

Research team members

A team of researchers at the University of Kentucky is working to better understand the impact of opioid use disorder on mothers and babies.

Every 24 minutes in the United States, a baby is born with neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS) after being exposed in mothers with opioid use disorder.

(Left-right): Stephanie White, Rebecca Todd, Makayla Arnett, Leon Lamoreaux and Chipper Griffith.

In celebration of National Rural Health Day, yesterday the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield Medicaid in Kentucky announced new scholarship opportunities for UK’s Rural Physi

Image of scholars on bicycles with UK faculty and school administration

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology’s philanthropy project was a big success – raising more the $12,000 to support transdisciplinary education at Lexington’s Rise STEM Academy for Girls. The academy utilized the funds to purchase two sets of bicycles to provide scholars with a multitude of learning opportunities. 

Woman hugging her stomach while curled up on a couch.

UK HealthCare is the first in the state to offer the innovative Sonata® Treatment for women suffering from debilitating symptoms caused by uterine fibroids, including heavy periods.

GME winners

The following individuals were honored at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine Awards Convocation on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2023. Winners included those in Bowling Green, Lexington, Morehead, and Northern Kentucky.

Biomedical Education

Outstanding Graduate Student Award:
Jamila Tucker, MS

photo of Paula Works and Franny Meritt

Franny Meritt, Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) in the UK College of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was recently named UK HealthCare’s first CNM of the Year! The special recognition was part of UK HealthCare’s Celebration of National Advanced Practice Provider (APP) week. National APP week was celebrated September 25-29, 2023.

Dr. DeFranco

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine is thrilled to announce that after an extensive search, Emily DeFranco, DO, MS, has been selected to serve as the new chair of obstetrics and gynecology.

A picture of four pregnant women holding their stomachs

A team of researchers at the University of Kentucky is working to reduce the number of deaths and injuries among pregnant and postpartum women through an online training program for UK students in helping professions across nine UK colleges.

Dr. Harbin

Mackenzie Harbin, MD, is gynecologic-oncology fellow (PGY-7) at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Originally from Frankfort, Ky., she cherishes the opportunity to return to the Bluegrass to care for women in the Commonwealth.

From left to right: Dr. Rachel Wilson, Lisa Williams, Renee Gallagher, and LeAnn Barber

Burnout is a problem in any profession, but it is rampant in health care. This national problem has been evident recently as the COVID-19 pandemic pushed many learners, practitioners, faculty, and staff to the limit.

Image of Dr. Flowers, Amandah Hesselbrock and Baby

When Amandah Hesselbrock found out 37 weeks into her pregnancy that her fourth baby was in a breech position, she was overwhelmed with anxiety. Breech babies account for about 4% of all full-term pregnancies and often result in a Cesarean birth (C-section). 

Image of Drs. Saunders, Rone, and Flowers

The mission of the department of obstetrics and gynecology is to provide excellent and advanced clinical care, educate the next generation of physicians, and research the questions that lead to discovery and advancement. The mission only succeeds when we have committed faculty who devote their career to these grand goals.

Stock photo of woman on computer

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine is excited to announce that faculty, staff, learners, and trainees will have free access to a leading online resource for medical Spanish proficiency.

CanopyLearn, a Spanish language training program for health care professionals, will be available to the UK College of Medicine community starting Aug. 1.

A purple filtered image of a diabetic person checking their blood sugar.

A new study conducted by a group of researchers, including the interim executive director of the University of Kentucky Center for Research on Violence Against Women (CRVAW), has found that people who experience interpersonal violence or child abuse face a more than 20% increased risk of developing diabetes.